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20130218
20130218
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
cheats of all kinds. it's a world u.s. law enforcement has rarely been able to penetrate. so the idea the ubs, one of switzerland's largest banks, would agree to turn over information on thousands of american tax cheats would have once been unthinkable. but it happened in part because of a whistle-blower who i sat down with in 2010. for his efforts he's been rewarded with a federal prison term and the possibility of endless riches. though he was born and raised in the boston area, bradley birkenfeld spent most of the last decade living in switzerland, helping wealthy americans hide their money. he was based in geneva, where he says there may be more money-counting machines than parking meters, in a country that once bragged it had more banks than dentists. >> it's not swiss money in those banks. it's foreigners'. you have a culture there that has been ingrained in society about managing people's money, protected by swiss bank secrecy. >> and who has a right to that information under swiss law? >> only the banker and the bank itself. >> how unusual is it for a swiss banker to come forw
be a felony to use stem cells in an unapproved therapy or to sell them for export to the u.s. that's why we were surprised to see this on many websites: a shoppingart. we clicked on eckluns stem tech labs cart, and, with no medical or scientific credentials, we bought 20 million umbilical cord stem lls for $5,000, shipped to america. we had the cells sent by the highest medical standard. duke university suggested we use something called a dry shipper, cooled with liquid nitrogen. we sent the dry shipper to stem tech. stem tech sent the frozen cells to us. and we forwarded them to joanne kurtzberg. a computer chip inside our package verified that the cells were properly frozen all the way. dr. kurtzberg analyzed the cells. for comparison, look under the microscope. healthy umbilical cord stem cells look like this. the cells we got from stem tech had disintegrated. >> so these are the cells you purchased. and they are dying or dead. >> we see all of these dead and disintegrating cells and, essentially, cellular debris. >> mm-hmm. >> are there dangers of injecting that into someone? >> there a
street or for the u.s. a main street brand. but they have this great digital fashion thing going on. it's a gimmicky partnership with google. you see these reports about google getting the lines between fashion and retail and tech are all blurring. >> they are, indeed. so on today's show, there's a -- here is another taster. in china, it's the first trading day market in the new year of the snake. so will it be new year old problems? up next from hong kong, we'll have the latest analysis. >> did you just slither? also, the final week of campaigning in italy ahead of the general elections. we will be live in milan throughout the morning for a roundup of the candidates policies and pit falls. julia will join us for that. >>> and hear state from the finance ministers. we have a roundup of the g-20 meeting in moscow. >> and london fashion week is under way and international expansion seems to be the latest trend. we'll hear from top designers who are putting their foot forward on the global runway. >>> first, standard & poors says it wants more time to gauge shinzo abe's rating policies. s&
. nothing to write home about, but in the u.s. as an example, stay and local government actually grew for us this quarter and federal was not down as much year over year as we've seen in prior quarters. >> and another sign of improvement in the housing market. the number of u.s. homes entering the foreclosure process in january fell to a level not seen since the peak of the housing boom. down 11% from december but all is not well says housing baron sam zell. >> everybody kind of has ignored the fact that there's still 3 to 4 million houses in purgatory. not for sale. not foreclosed. maybe occupied, maybe not occupied. and you've got to address that. >> if you're looking for somebody who has done it all, look no further. he's with us. bob hormats is vice president of goldman sachs international. at the state department making the case for american companies overseas. bob, it's good to see you again. >> great to be back on your show. >> thank you so much for joining us. let me begin on sort of this front-and-center issue that we're all talking about and that is sequestration. mandatory spendin
when claims for unemployment benefits in the u.s. were the highest in nearly 30 years. in december 2008, just before all the speeches and parties of inauguration day, scott pelley headed to ohio to find out what questions the families in wilmington were asking. >> are we going to lose our home? you know, are we going to be able to pay our property taxes? what are we're gonna do for insurance? what are we're gonna do for food? you know, and these are questions that you'd never think that you'd ask yourself, you know. and now they're discussions in the home. >> bear hug, big. >> [grunting] i love you, buddy. >> mike o'machearley is losing the job that helps support four children and a grandson. they always say that god closes a door, he opens another one. we have faith that he will. >> faith is what sustains wilmington now. settled by quakers 200 years ago, it's a community with such an all-american look, that it seems like a movie set. about 12,000 people live here, and many, like o'machearley, work in the last industry you'd expect in a laid-back town. in 1980 airborne express turned wi
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)

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